Kawasaki EL TORO 175 Tracker by Iron Macchina Customs

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A new bike builder is on the rise based in the Southern Tagalog region. Iron Macchina’s maiden small displacement build shows a little bullish attitude when it comes to its given name, El Torro ( The Bull). the base bike, Kawasaki Barako 175cc, a popular daily habal or pantra bike in the Philippines gave an exceptional remarks in todays growing custom bike scene in the archipelago.

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“The El Toro” concept is the definition of hard work, passion and quality motorcycle craftsmanship. Built with the builder’s own hands and created a concept that Iron Macchina can be proud of. The owner of Iron Macchina, Symon Cantos was a grease monkey ever since and one of his passion is motorcycles. Like every custom bike builder, he love the idea of fiddling his bikes and making it more unique. Like everybody else they wanted their bikes to standout and have a character of its own. That’s where “IRON MACCHINA CUSTOMS” comes in.

Symon Cantos is a professional wakeboarder turned motorcycle junky. Back then he owns a Ducati Monster and Honda Steed 400. “I love motorcycles. I started riding and experience the thrill of two wheels back then when I was a kid.” Says Symon. “When I started with this project, I rendered a concept bike in my computer to overlook and mix up the design before the execution. I researched on what model to purchase as a project bike to be used as the first demo bike for Iron Macchina Customs. It was a hard pick since there are lots of good brands in the market that offers the same variant with a very competitive price. I ended up purchasing the Kawasaki Barako 2 since it has the highest displacement (175cc) and one of the most durable bike in its class.”

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“Building a bike is not easy. I think most of the bike builders knows that there are lot of things to consider, like getting the right parts, right size of the rims/tires, fabrication and alterations and a lot more. But then again, it’s the process that matters. Getting all things done perfectly and efficiently.”

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Building the El Toro

“I started off by cutting the tail end of the chassis to reduce the width of the bike and to put a much shorter seat. After cutting the tail end, I attached a same diameter of G.I. tube which I had bended in a local bending shop nearby. I welded it in place and cleaned all the residue and body painted it to make it look originally part of the bike.”

…”Next is the seat; I fabricated a seat pan using “Ipil hardwood” and mount it perfectly on to the chassis. Cleaned and varnished it to make it more durable. After its done, I had it upholstered with dark brown leather (straight stitch) with khaki colored stitching. Side panels are also wrapped with black textured leather with khaki stitching to blend with the seat.”

img_4193-01“One of the most challenging part of the build is getting the right tire/rim size. Sometimes you just have to do a trial and error procedure to get the perfect fit for your bike. In my case I went out asking people and measuring the exact space of the under chassis based from the original rims and tires. This process saved me a lot of time to get the perfect size for my wheel set. I went with 1.85/18inch rims and 4.10×18 tires for both front and back to make the bike look taller and bigger.”

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“With the tank, I painted it off with straight color faded whitish-yellow for a more classic look. I kept it nice and simple without lining, pin stripping or what so ever, just make sure that it wouldn’t over lapped the whole look of the bike.”

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“I also fabricated the chain guard and tail light bracket from a scrap aluminum. I incorporated the design from how the bike looks and kept its original shade to balance the color combination of the bike. With the tail light, I ended up putting it bellow the left rear shocks to keep the fender clean and have that classic look from rear view. The front and rear fenders originally came from the front fender of the barako 2, cut and shaped it to compliment the roundness of the tires.

Few parts are outsourced from some of our good friends in Moto build Pilipinas group in facebook.

Iron Macchina Customs will offer full quality customization service for motorcycles, mainly aesthetics, fabrications, alterations, painting and other related services. The shop is on its soft opening which started roughly around 2nd week of September 2016.

BASE BIKE: Kawasaki Barako 2

DISPLACEMENT: 175cc

TYPE OF BUILD: Tracker

TIME LINE: 2 weeks

BUILDER: Iron Macchina Customs (Symon Cantos)

FACEBOOK:  www.facebook.com/Ironmacchinaph/

INSTAGRAM: @ironmacchinaph

Email: [email protected]